Posts Tagged ‘protein’

Media Reality Check: Nutrients and Veganism

May 22, 2012

On nearly every single one of my major media appearances, the network has felt it necessary to consult “the other side”—a doctor, a psychologist, or a nutritionist (personally, I think veganism is inherently the other side). Not one of these talking heads has been a vegan representative—as if none exist to consult. In each instance, these folks have reinforced the public with the same exact biased messages that continue to justify the standard American diet:

“It’s hard to get protein, B12, calcium, and fat on a vegan diet.”
“Vegans have to be extra careful…”
“Vegan diets are dangerous…we absolutely need the nutrients we get from animal foods.”
“Meat-free diets can cause deficiencies…”
“Kids may become malnourished.”

So, we know where conventional medicine stands, and frankly, they’re about twenty years behind doctors doing plant-based-diet research. Their facts are so distorted and empty, it’s actually shocking. But like I’ve said before, the majority of opposition can be explained by fear, ignorance, and industry collusion. So let’s clear up some of these concerns with a few reality-check points:

Seek experienced advice: You wouldn’t take swimming lessons from someone who never learned to swim. Don’t take advice from any doctor or nutritionist who is not a successful vegan themselves. Current conventional medicine is not based on healthy people who have found solutions, but rather sick populations with unnecessary chronic disease caused by normalized unhealthy habits. Most doctors simply don’t stay current on the most advanced vegan research and protocols. Their work is more geared towards alleviating symptoms, not healing the root cause. Seek out the best medical and nutritional advice in the field from the likes of Dr. Joel Fuhrman, Dr. Gabriel Cousens, David Wolfe, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn and Dr. T. Colin Campbell, Dr. Neal Barnard, Dr. Jameth Sheridan, and Dr. Michael Greger. Also, books by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, Victoria Moran, and Brendan Brazier.

The SAD food pyramid vs. the plant-based pyramid: The nutritionists and conventional doctors (many have as little as six hours of nutritional training) that oppose or caution against veganism seem to base their advice on the standard American diet (SAD) food pyramid. To be clear: with veganism, we are not talking about the standard American food pyramid minus meat and dairy (this leaves nothing upon nothing). A plant-based pyramid has an entirely different arrangement of food groups that provides for all of our human needs for macronutrients (carbs, protein, and fat) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and antioxidants). By exploring a plant-based pyramid and vegan nutrient recommendations, everyone will reap the benefits of finding micronutrients the American public is generally  deficient in.

The ANDI Chart: The Aggregate Nutrient Density Index rates the micronutrient quality of foods on a scale from 1-1000, taking into consideration vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and antioxidants. Kale and mustard greens: 1000. All animal products fall in the 30s or below. If you are eating a variety of whole foods, you are most likely already getting all the macronutrients you need (carbs, protein, fats). It’s time for everyone to focus the bulk of their diets on foods that provide micronutrients the average person is not getting. Conventional doctors and nutritionists need a reality check on who “needs to be careful.”

Chronic disease: Studies continue to show the link between chronic disease and consuming animal products. Let’s look at the trajectory for kids in this country:
•50% or more of Americans adults are on pharmaceutical medication.
•20% of children ages 2-19 are obese.
•30% of girls are getting their periods by age 8.
•The Center for Disease Control lists cancer and heart disease as the two leading causes of death.
These maladies are all exacerbated, if not caused, by eating meat and dairy. The standard American diet has been given its chance and it has proven to be a disaster. One hundred years ago, people only became ill in the last few months of their lives. Today, the average person will experience at least a decade of disease and unnecessary suffering. For many, transitioning to a plant-based diet at a young age will be a life-saving choice.

Protein: The average American gets too much protein (remember, extra is stored as fat). Many people don’t know that proteins are simply chains of amino acids, and that plant proteins contain all essential amino acids. The vegan pyramid provides a healthy amount of protein with a lower biological value than animal products, which prevents IGF reactions (insulin-like growth factors that trigger cancer and tumor growth). According to the USDA, children need about .4 grams of protein per healthy pound of body weight. For kids ages 4-6, that only amounts to about 15-20 g. protein per day! One piece of sprouted whole grain toast (4 g. protein) with a couple tablespoons of almond butter (6 g. protein) and you’re half, or more than half-way, done by breakfast. Protein is not hard to find in a plant-based diet.

B12: Conventional nutrition will tell you that vitamin B12 can only be found in animal-products. This is factually skewed and distorted. B12 is neither an animal-based nor plant-based micronutrient, but bacteria-based. If we were all eating foods pulled straight from the ground, we would be getting sufficient amounts of B12 in the grooves of our veggies, for example. If people are getting B12 at all from meat, it is because the animal ate grass and stored B12 in her gut—B12 is not inherent to the flesh. But most animals are not grass-fed these days. B12 is crucial for everyone, but the reality is that 50-90% of meat-eaters are deficient in optimum levels of B12, too! NO ONE EVER MENTIONS THAT! I eat lots of nutritional yeast and spirulina and my levels are in the normal range after 9 years of veganism, but because everyone seems to absorb B12 differently, the only accurate test is an MMA blood or urine test. If your levels are low, add B12-fortified foods into your diet along with a sublingual B12 (kids love them, they’re tiny and sweet). The methylcobalamin type is the most absorbable. Everyone can benefit by exploring the vegan pyramid because our research may shed light on nutrients everyone needs.

Fat: Fats and essential fatty acids are crucial, especially for children—but we want good fats that do not carry along the negative side effects that animal products do. Our brains live in 80% fatty tissue, so including raw organic fats in our repertoires is vital for all kinds of biological functions (some experts posit that our prehistoric advances in brain size may have been due to the fat content in the meat we hunted, not the protein). We also now know that vegans who eat nuts and seeds live longer than those who don’t. Choose excellent sources of raw, organic fats: olive oil and olives, seeds, nuts, nut and seed butters, algae oil (long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids), flax oil, hemp oil, walnut oil, coconut and coconut oil (healthy saturated fat), and avocados, for example. Note: new studies show that eating saturated fats together with Omega-3 fats doubles the absorbency of the Omegas, for example coconut oil and algae oil together.

Calcium: Animal products are a relatively poor source of calcium compared to leafy greens and cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, kale, and bok choy. Meat and dairy have an acidic PH, causing calcium to be leeched out of our bones into our bloodstream in order to alkalize our system. Studies (i, ii, iii) are now showing that the countries with the highest intake of dairy products also have the highest rates of osteoporosis. Even more important than the amount of calcium in a food is the amount we absorb (we absorb 60% of calcium from broccoli—VERY high). Calcium from plants is more bioavailable to our bodies and comes without harmful side effects like IGF (insuline-like growth factors) that trigger growth of tumors, cancer, and cell mutations. We know for a fact that toxins bioaccumulate up the food chain, so if one is eating meat or dairy, even from organic cows, you are ingesting an exponentially higher amount of toxins including PCBs, dioxins, and even radioactive particles. There is nowhere in the world that is untouched by these toxins, they are being found in the fatty tissue of polar bears. Calcium absorbency also depends on magnesium (which meat and dairy have very little of compared to plants). Fifty to 75% of the general public is also magnesium deficient. The best sources for maintaining a healthy balance come from a plant-based diet (and lucky for us, raw chocolate is one of the highest sources of magnesium on Earth!). Remember that the cow gets her calcium from eating grass.

Vitamin D: Fifty to 90% of Americans are deficient in D—this isn’t just a vegan problem. A 2007 study showed that even 50% of  young, healthy Hawaiian-island surfers lacked sufficient D due to immediate showering post-session. Supplemental D3 comes from lanolin, aka “wool grease,” a waxy substance secreted by sheep’s glands, the collection of which is a gross and abusive industry. Supplemental D2 is plant-based based, but it is unclear whether it provides absorbable amounts to sufficiently increase D serum. Mushrooms are now known to produce D3 and there are comapanies at work to provide mushroom-based D3. Source of Life brand claims to have such a product, but I have not verified its ingredients. With exposure to sunlight, our skin produces D on its own in a matter of minutes or  hours (depending on location and skin color), but it takes several hours for our bodies to absorb those oils—so spend some time in the early or late sun and don’t wash off!

In the words of the great Chuck D of Public Enemy, don’t believe the hype. Reality checked.

The Protein Myth

May 10, 2012

There are so many myths that meat-eating-vegan-haters have constructed over the years about why a plant-based diet is bad for you—it’s just straight up laughable.  But the greatest myth of all is the all too familiar question “Where do you get your protein?” The question is so ingrained into the consciousness of the American public, I can remember asking it myself when I was young.  The best part is that most people who ask that question don’t even know what protein is.

As meat loving Americans, we are obsessed with protein. Back in the days, athletes used to eat steaks before competitions because they thought it would improve their performance.  Shiiiit, I used to eat raw eggs after working out because, like Rocky, I thought I needed it to build muscle.  There is this idea that without animal protein, you will not only perform poorly, you may just wither away and die.  Well I’ve been vegan for sixteen years…and I’m thriving.

As Americans we usually get too much protein, not too little (remember that extra protein is stored in the body as fat).

So what is a protein? In layman’s terms,  proteins are made of chains of amino acids, which are found in all foods, not just meat and dairy. Of all the different amino acids, only eight are essential, meaning we need to consume them in food because our bodies do not produce them. As all plant proteins contain the full array of essential amino acids—albeit in different amounts—plant-based foods become entirely sufficient suppliers of protein when you go vegan.

Here are some amazing sources of vegan protein: dark leafy greens like kale, chard, mustard, and even Romaine lettuce; hemp seeds or rice protein powder, nuts, beans, seeds, and superfoods like spirulina and chlorella.  Typically, one needs about 0.4 grams of protein per day for every pound of healthy body weight. Some people need more protein, some less, but in any case, plant-based foods can certainly and easily fulfill anyone’s dietary needs.  If you start your day with a hemp powder smoothie, have a bowl of lentil soup for lunch, and a big salad topped with spirulina and pumpkin seeds and a side of quinoa, you’re good. On some days you might consume more, on some days, less—the key is adding new foods to your weekly repertoire. Let’s not forget where Popeye the Sailor Man got his knock-out power—spinach!!!

If you don’t think that you can get diesel from a plant-based diet, think again. Just ask Iron Mike Tyson—vegan.  Olympic medalist Carl Lewis—vegan. Mixed martial arts fighters Jake Shields, Nick Diaz, Jon Fitch…the list of vegan superheroes goes on and on until the break of dawn…myth dispelled.

The protein-deficiency myth has pushed been by the meat and dairy industries to instill fear of veganism, sell crap, and make us doubt that nature has not done enough to nourish us with greens, fruits, nuts, seeds and vegetables.  Seriously?  Let’s not forget that the largest most powerful animals on the planet are herbivores. Gorillas, giraffes, hippos, horses and rhinos—WHAT!  I personally feel strong as an ox—oh snap! Oxen are vegan, too!

There are so many deficiency worries when it comes to the vegan diet, I can only think that most people just take for granted that the mainstream information they’ve been fed their whole lives is accurate. Proof? The other common questions are always the same: “Where do you get your calcium?” “Where do you get your iron?”  “Where do you get your Omega 3s?” And of course the only one that’s actually justifiable: “Where do you get your rockstar clear skin?”

Damn, I feel good…but that’s just how you feel when you’re vegan!!!

Pumpkin Seed Pesto Recipe

January 31, 2012


Pesto is one of the easiest, most gourmet-tasting recipes to play with—and it’s raw food! Using pumpkin seeds makes this version not only tasty, but high in essential fatty acids and protein (pumpkin seeds have about 29% more protein than most other seeds). Plus, pumpkin seeds contains most of the B vitamins, C, D, E and K, as well as calcium, potassium, and phosphorus. Use this pesto as a veggie dip, mix it onto pasta, spread it on crackers, in tortilla wraps, or keep it raw on salads, or in lettuce rolls. Here I blended the following:
•1 bunch of basil.
•About 2/3 c. of raw pumpkin seeds.
•Olive oil (just enough to blend ingredients smoothly—add a little at a time if you’re unsure).
•1 clove of garlic.
•Salt to taste.

Optional additions: a spoonful of nutritional yeast, parsley, sun-dried tomatoes (on top or blended in). You can also use pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts in place of pumpkin seeds.

Sweet and savory spiced kale

January 16, 2012

Before we were vegan, neither Bua nor I had ever had kale. Now, 16 and 9 years later, respectively, our weekly farmers market purchase usually includes 4-10 bunches. And it’s not just us vegans (though I do believe we are responsible for the trend). This deep, hearty green has become the new romaine apparently. Our basic raw kale salad recipe is still great, but if you’re looking for a new variation, try this Indian-spiced dressing:

•Coat chopped, raw kale with olive oil. Add sea salt and Braggs to taste (or shoyu), and a good dose to taste of both turmeric and cinammon. Mix and bruise until kale is soft, or mix and let sit to soften.

Turmeric is known in Ayurvedic and other natural medicine traditions for it’s anti-cancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties (which applies to pretty much every disease or malady one might have)—all in all, a great thing to have in your spice pantry and weekly repertoire. Read a great description of the benefits here. Cinnamon as well is considered to have beneficial properties for the digestive, circulatory, and respiratory systems.

Mushrooms: meaty, mighty, medicinal

November 2, 2011


Having quality mushrooms in your repertoire will add new dimensions to your vegan life. Savory and grounding, they give you that satisfied feeling that some seek when replacing meat. And having been used in natural medicine for thousands of years, we reap multiple rewards for having  mushrooms in our diets—immunologically, neurologically, energetically, and even spiritually.

Mushrooms are complex organisms—no roots, seeds, or leaves, they seem neither plant nor animal, but otherworldly. The studies on each variety are deep and fascinating. Medicinal varieties are known to have a dual-directional “special intelligence” when it comes to their healing properties, an ability to “know” how they are needed in our bodies, for example, either to be stimulating to a weak immune system or to subdue an overactive nervous response. And with DNA 80% identical to our own, medicinal mushrooms like reishi, shiitake, cordyceps, maitake, and chaga are used very efficiently by our immune, nervous, and cardiovascular systems. David Wolfe and Paul Stamets are mycologists to follow to learn more about supplementing with medicinal mushrooms.

General mushroom benefits include:
•Vitamins B2, B3, B5, B6, D.
•Quality (bio-available) essential amino acids (aka proteins).
•Iron, potassium, selenium, phosphorous, copper.
•Increased immunity against viruses, bacteria, pollution, and molds.
•Energy balancing, increased endurance.
•Antioxidants, anti-cancer, anti-inflammation.

Okay, nutritionally beneficial, CHECK. Now on to eating and taste. I was recently craving something “meaty,” but stood grossed out at the processed faux-meat selection at the store. I don’t like single item foods that contain 1,000 ingredients. I waited out the craving and a few days later took a photo of this amazing mushroom bloom near a friend’s house. That week, I found the same mushroom at the Hollywood Farmer’s Market booth LA Funghi (did the universe bring it to me?! Is this the spiritual effects of mushrooms?!). It’s called “Chicken of the Woods.” WHOOOOAAAA. Check out that texture, right?  We marinated it in a little olive oil, lemon juice, rosemary, salt, and mustard, and sauteed it in a bit of water. Craving 100% satisfied.

It’s in season, so it’s a staple in our fridge right now. Last night, I made a chicken-of-the-woods noodle soup:

A google search for “gourmet mushrooms” and your zip code will find you the real “mycophiles” in your hood. And your local grocer will carry at least brown and white caps or portobellos (great for grilling and sandwhiches) and shiitake (easy addition to miso soups). Pick only the ones that look fresh and free from wet spots and mold. You can even buy grow-at-home kits now. Happy eating, happy living!

Vegan Shopping List 101

October 4, 2011


New to veganism? Make sure you don’t burn out on sugar, carbs, and soy by using this basic shopping list as a guide at the grocery store. Starred items should be staples:

GREENS:
Greens need to be a significant portion of  your diet for fiber, iron, calcium, detox, and alkalinity. Start with these, and try eating 2 salads a day:
-*kale (especially dino and curly)
-*romaine (counts as a deep green!)
-*parsley or cilantro
-green onions

OILS & GOOD FATS:
You NEED good fats. They carry 9 cal/g while proteins and carbs have 4. This means sustained energy, plus hormone support, and essential nutrients.
-*organic, cold-pressed olive oil
-organic, cold-pressed flax/hemp oil
-*raw nuts & seeds  (almonds, cashews, sunflower, pumpkin)
-*avocado (eat as many as you want a day)

FRUITS (sweet, non-sweet, and fatty):
With seeds is best. Seedless=hybridized.

-*olives (sundried best, not in a can)
-*cacao (raw chocolate: look for powder, nibs, or whole beans)
-*tomatoes
-cucumber
-all berries (don’t forget dried goji berries)
-*apples
-oranges, grapefruit (and eat your citrus seeds, too!)
-figs
-melons

PROTEINS:
-*quinoa
-*hemp (seeds, powder; contains essential fatty acids; sprinkle on salads or blend in smoothies)
-*hummus (so many kinds! Become a connoiseur)
-*raw almond butter
-*raw nuts and seeds (almonds, cashews, pumpkin, sunflower)
-*nori sheets

CARBS:
When buying carbs, look for sprouted grain breads or tortillas, sometimes in the cold section. Our favorites:
-*Ezekiel sprouted grain tortillas (best toasty…we spin/flip ours over our stove’s open flame, ready in seconds to be filled with hummus, greens, olive oil, and sea salt)
-*Ezekiel sprouted grain bread (so many kinds)
-rice (brown is more nutritious, but also more glutenous than basmati white)

FERMENTED FOODS:
You may as well start now!  These are essential for building good bacteria in the gut, especially B12. Find these in the cold section:
-raw sauerkraut (throw in a nori wrap with avocado, Vegenaise, greens, and salt!)
-raw kimchi
-Bio-K non-dairy “yogurt” (expensive, but do it once in a while)
-kombucha drinks
-coconut kefir (all you need is a TBS/day)

SWEETS & SWEETENERS:
-agave
-dates
-dark chocolate bars

CONDIMENTS:
-*Nutritional yeast (great for B12. Use like you would parmesan, or in salads and soups for that extra hearty flavor. We put this on everything)
-*Braggs Aminos (every health food store has it. Savory salty flavor; easiest salad dressing: olive oil, Braggs, nutritional yeast)
-*Himalayan sea salt (very important investment. See why)
-Vegenaise (dressing/spread)
-Tofutti (not best food ever, but tasty: non-hydrogenated “cream cheese”; original flavor is our fave)
-Daiya cheese (best tasting, and NO dairy/soy! Made from cassava root…and it melts!)


BEVERAGES:
-rice milk, almond milk, hemp milk
-tea
-kombucha
-coconut water

SUPPLEMENTALS:
We’ll get into more of this later,  lists 201, 301, etc. Start with at least one of the following:
-spirulina powder (we like Pure Hawaiian Spirulina Pacifica in salads and smoothies)
-chlorella tablets (if our 6 y.o. likes to chew these for fun, you can certainly  handle it, or put them in a smoothie)

SAMPLE DAY
•Morning smoothie:
-water/tea base
-pick a protein: scoop of almond butter/almonds/cashews/hemp
-big spoonful cacao powder
-pick a green(s): spirulina/chlorella/mint/parsley
-sweetener: agave or dates
-ice…and BLEND!

•Lunch:
-toasted Ezekiel tortilla with hummus, greens, and sprinkled with olive oil, nutritional yeast, spirulina, and sea salt
-kale salad (recipe here) topped with tomato and cucumber

•Snacks:
-Apples and almond butter
-Avocado and sea salt
-Goji/cashew/cacao bean trail mix
-Cucumber and sea salt

•Dinner:
-Quinoa with chopped parsley/green onions, olive oil, braggs, garlic
-Romaine salad with a dollop of dijon, olive oil, sea salt, and agave

Raw vegan probiotic nut cheese

September 26, 2011

Raw vegan almond cheese topped with dried oregano & pepper flakes

This is way easier than we thought. Don’t worry about exact measurements, just experiment with the following basic idea: soak cashews or almonds, blend with probiotic, let sit. Here’s what we did:

1. Soak raw cashews in water for at least 2 hours. The longer you soak, the softer they become, the better they blend. If you use almonds instead, soak overnight and then pinch each one to peel off the skins.

2. Drain the nuts and blend with sea salt and a few squeezes of lemon juice to taste. Add just enough water— a tiny bit at a time—to make it blend. Optional: add nutritional yeast, garlic, herbs, etc, to taste.

3. Add a probiotic element. This could be a spoonful of organic miso paste, a TBS of coconut kefir, or the powder inside a probiotic capsule. Blend gently for a couple of seconds (it’s best not to “chop up” the microscopic culture strains).

Step 4 with our little rock weight.

4. Some people skip the next cheese-cloth step  and just put the mixture into a boiled-clean glass jar. But we did this: hang a double-bagged cheese-cloth inside a jar and pour in the mixture. Fold in the inside bag and lay a small weight on top to press out any liquid, we used a little rock!

5. Cover the jar with a cap or plate and place it in a room-temperature spot for 24-48 hours. We actually put our jar in the dehydrator set on 100 degrees (low) to speed up the process overnight. In the end, you can use the liquid collected at the bottom of the jar as the probiotic element in the next batch.

You’ll know it’s done because it will smell “cheesy.” The longer you leave it, the more sour (fermented) the cheese will be. Pack the drained mixture into a glass container, let cool in the fridge, and enjoy!  Optional: top with dried oregano and pepper flakes.

Step 5

 

But I only eat grassfed bison…

September 12, 2011

Years of study has led us to the following rule: Whether it’s a feather hair extension or grass-fed bison you’re buying, whenever and wherever animals are exchanged for money, you can bet it’s dirty business.

Switching from factory-farmed meat to grass-fed bison, for example, doesn’t eliminate environmental degradation, water and energy waste, water-deprived truck rides to the butcher, slaughter, or lowlife politics. Switching meats often just changes the set of problems. For example:

•Many bison ranches are adjacent to natural parks where wild bison and wild elk roam. When wild animals carrying brucellosis (an infectious bacteria transmittable to humans and other animals) cross park boundaries during their winter migratory routes, they can infect ranched herds—the common consequences being that the rancher must kill his entire stable. So in the interest of cattle farmers, the state of Montana, under, for example, the Interagency Bison Management Plan, drives back its wild bison herds using helicopters, hazing, slaughter, and penning. In 2004 at Yellowstone National Park, 264 wild bison were rounded up and slaughtered in order to protect 180 cows grazing on land nearby. Another 198 were rather corralled until the following season, but for lack of space in the pen, 57 were killed without even testing for brucellosis. In 2008, 1,616 bison were driven from park borders and slaughtered.

•North America used to be home to 50 million bison.  Now, the last free-roaming, genetically pure herd—descendents of 23 wild bison that survived mass slaughter— exist in Yellowstone National Park, numbering 3,000. Wildlife advocates have been working to restore Yellowstone’s bison populations for relocation onto protected areas nationwide, but ranch lobbyists around the country stand in the way. Because of ranchers’ fear of brucellosis spreading to their cattle, wild bison may never be allowed to repopulate public land again, especially because the competition against livestock owners for cheap grazing land is fierce.

•Even if your grass-fed bison is “organic”  today, it still may have been genetically modified and bred in the past. Being that the only pure herd exists in Montana, the many ranched bison across America are not as natural as a consumer might hope, but rather mixed with cattle genes.

So think about it: Are organic grassfed bison farmers the people you want to be giving your money to? What side of  politics do you want to be on?


Sources: LA Times1, LA Times2, and Save the Buffalo Campaign.
Photos from: Photos from http://www.buffalofieldcampaign.org


Kale Salad: The Crowd Pleaser

July 5, 2011


No one doesn’t like this savory salad. It’s the one recipe we’ve spread around the most…and it’s a life changer:
•Wash the kale (any kind will do).
•Debone (or not) and chop/rip up.
•Add Braggs Aminos to taste and coat with olive oil. The more you stir and massage, the softer the kale.
•Top with nutritional yeast.

Keep a head or two of washed kale in your fridge in a salad spinner and you’ll be set for days. Or make a huge batch and marinate overnight. Other great toppings: red onion or garlic, a dollop of hummus, lemon juice, sea salt, avocado, dried cranberries and sliced almonds, spirulina powder.

Kitchen Staples: Quinoa

June 29, 2011


Quinoa (say keen-wah) is an ancient South American seed prepared like rice. Light and fluffy, it is one of the quickest, easiest, most versatile to make—rinse (you must wash away any remaining bitter resin from harvest) and cook 1:2 quinoa-to-water for about 15-20 min…and you can go savory or sweet from there. Quinoa contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a complete protein and a good source of grounding energy, iron, and B vitamins…and it’s gluten free so you won’t get that heavy, sticky feeling after eating. Our go-to recipe for quick meals: top the quinoa with raw olive oil and Braggs, chopped greens (mint, parsley, or green onions, etc.) and a little fresh garlic or red onion…so satisfying.


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